Do I Have To Pay For My Parent’s Care?

Adult children often ask, do I have to pay for my parent’s care?  That depends. If you have taken control of your parent’s assets and income, absent a provision in a durable power of attorney allowing you to gift your parent’s funds to yourself, you are generally required to use your parent’s money to pay for their care.  But what if your parent’s funds are already spent down and beyond your reach? A recent published New York case considered this question and took an interesting and pro-child approach to the subject. 

In Wedgewood Care Center, Inc., Etc. v. Kravitz, 2021 N.Y. Slip Op. 04731 (N.Y. App.Div., 2nd Dept., August 18, 2021), the New York Supreme Court Appellate Division overturned an award for a for profit nursing home, which sued the son of its former resident. The nursing home wanted to hold the son liable for his mother’s unpaid nursing home bill for the sum of approximately $49,000.  An irrevocable burial trust was funded with some of the mother’s funds.  The nursing home argued (among other points) that the resident’s son, who was named as her agent under her durable power of attorney, violated his mother’s nursing home admissions agreement by failing to use all of his mother’s money to pay for her care and by not getting his mother approved for Medicaid benefits quickly enough. 

In the trial court, the resident’s son argued that he could not be held liable for the cost of his mother’s care, as this would violate the federal Nursing Home Reform Act.  The nursing home focused on the admissions agreement, which required the son pay his mother’s nursing home bills from the assets and income of his mother within his control if he could do so without incurring any personal financial liability. The trial judge ruled for the nursing home. 

On appeal, the appellate court concluded that the funds in the irrevocable burial trust were not available to the son to pay for his mother’s care because the son was unable to withdraw this money and apply the funds to pay for his mother’s care.  With respect to the timeliness of the Medicaid award for the mother, the appeals court noted that the nursing home failed to identify any specific document that the son should have provided to the Medicaid office but failed to do so. The matter was remanded for further proceedings and should not be interpreted as a “get out of jail free” card for adult children who do not cooperate fully in the parent’s Medicaid application process.  

The bottom line is that a seasoned elder law attorney can help you understand and carry out your duties to assist in your parent’s Medicaid spend down and application and that your obligations may be more complicated than they seem at first blush. When in doubt, it is a good idea to consult an elder law attorney to explain the rights, duties and obligations incumbent upon you and your parent under a long-term care admissions agreement, the federal Nursing Home Reform Act and state law. 

Master Your Finances Radio Show Appearance

Special thanks to Kurt Baker, host of the radio show “Master Your Finances,” for inviting me on his show to discuss how recent legal, economic and social changes, including the COVID-19 pandemic, can impact the finances of the elderly and disabled and their families, what you can do to protect your life savings. The segment aired on Sunday, September 13, 2020 at 9:00 AM on 107.7 FM TheBronc and is now available on demand on the Master Your Finances website.

Other topics we discussed during the segment on practical financial issues include:

  • How the SECURE Act really impacts your retirement plan and why it is very important to update estate planning for your tax-qualified retirement accounts (i.e., individual retirement accounts, 401(k)’s, 403(b)’s, 457(b)’s) 
  • Why life insurance and long term care policies are important investments in your family’s future
  • Estate planning strategies you might not have thought of, including a ROTH IRA conversion
  • How to ensure that your estate plan accomplishes what you intended 
  • Tips and traps for retirement income planning, including how the new individual retirement rollover rules affect your bottom line 
  • Health insurance tips and traps (and how to avoid them) in the event of a job loss
  • How to protect your home and your life savings while getting your loved one the best long-term care
  • How to navigate the changes to the long term care and Medicaid application process landscapes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic
  • How the COVID-19 pandemic is exacerbating the mental health crisis and the important steps you can take to protect yourself and your finances if you are faced with an involuntary commitment

For more information on the “Master Your Finances” radio show, click here.

Jane Fearn-Zimmer is a shareholder in the Elder and Disability LawTaxation, and Trusts and Estates Groups. She dedicates her practice to serving clients in the areas of elder and disability law, special needs planning, asset protection, tax and estate planning and estate administration. She also serves as Chair of the Elder & Disability Law section of the NJSBA.