ABLE Savings Registry – The Gift that Keeps on Giving

ABLE Program in New JerseyABLE accounts are special, tax qualified disability savings vehicles for seriously disabled individuals, who had a qualifying disability incurred prior to age 26.  As long as the rules of the ABLE program are complied with, a seriously disabled individual can receive up to $15,000 (in 2019) in funds in an ABLE account without the funds being counted against him in determining the individual’s eligibility for public benefits, including Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income.

Favorable income tax provisions apply to protect the income earned on funds contributed to an ABLE account, as long as the contribution is not distributed out of the account, or if the contributions are distributed out of the ABLE account, any income is not subject to federal income tax to the extent that it is spent during the same calendar year for qualified disability related expenses.

Qualified disability expenses are expenses which relate to the account beneficiary’s blindness or disability and enhance his or her enjoyment of life as a result of the disability. Qualified disability expenses can encompass basic living expenses, transportation, education, assistive technology, legal expenses, medical care and education and training.

Here is a digital-age tip for parents, grandparents and gift-giving relatives of young adults who are eligible for an ABLE account and want to attend college. There is a new, web platform www.giftofcollege.com which can help make saving for college (while continuing to qualify for means-tested public benefits) easier than ever.  The new platform enables a disabled individual eligible to link their ABLE account to an online profile. Invitations to contribute funds can also be sent electronically.

For more disability savings strategies and resources, consult with an experienced special needs and disability lawyer.

Questions? Let Jane know.

Jane Fearn-Zimmer is a shareholder in the Elder and Disability LawTaxation, and Trusts and Estates Groups. She dedicates her practice to serving clients in the areas of elder and disability law, special needs planning, asset protection, tax and estate planning and estate administration. She also serves as Chair of the Elder & Disability Law section of the NJSBA.

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