A Path to Financial Freedom

What if there was a simple way to finance your future long-term care?

How can you age in place at home without spending a fortune? Does that sound too good to be true? It’s not. If you are still insurable, advance planning with long-term care insurance can keep your options open.

Most of us will need a skilled nursing level of care, some for months or years. Medicare, Medigap and other health insurance plans do not pay for custodial care. These policies will only pay for limited sub-acute and skilled care for limited periods. Disability insurance is intended to replace your earned income from work if you become disabled.

What if you have a medical crisis and need 24/7 care? At a cost of over $5,000 per month at the private pay rate, even staying at home with paid care can be very expensive. https://www.genworth.com/aging-and-you/finances/cost-of-care.html.

The benefits of long-term care insurance. Long-term care insurance can help protect your family’s financial and emotional freedom and can facilitate asset protection planning.

How to you get and pay for long-term care insurance? Policies are typically purchased while the insured has attained the age of forty and before approximately age 66. With age, the risk of uninsurability increases.

Some federal and state government employers offer long-term care insurance. It may also be available through some private employers. Long-term care insurance can also be purchased through an insurance agent. Private banks also can help high net worth individuals obtain specially priced policies. Some individuals use their qualified retirement assets to pay for long-term care insurance premiums. Many policies are tax-qualified, meaning that the benefits paid under the policy may not be subject to income taxes. Some policies have special Medicaid protections. These are called “partnership policies.”

It is very important to understand what the policy will cover and how the elimination period will work. Make sure any long-term care insurance you purchase is a policy you can still afford if the premiums increase. Talk to your elder care attorney if you think you may want to lower the benefit amount or increase the waiting period before benefits are payable under the policy.

Individuals who want to plan for themselves can benefit from long-term care insurance. Dick and Jane are married and in their mid-sixties. Dick is a government employee with a long-term care insurance policy through his work. The policy pays four years of benefits after a 90-day elimination period. Dick has a serious fall and fractures requiring surgery. He goes into the hospital for surgery and contracts COVID-19 in the hospital. By the time he is ready for discharge from the hospital, he is generally deconditioned and just wants to go home.

Jane is a petite woman. She tells the hospital discharge planner that she is afraid she might hurt herself if she tries to lift Dick himself. Dick needs constant hands-on assistance to perform activities like walking, dressing, bathing, toileting, and transferring from a bed to a chair. At first, the social worker was recommending placement in a nursing home or rehabilitation for Dick, due to concern that Jane can’t care for Dick safely in the home. But after learning that there is a long-term care insurance policy, the hospital discharges Dick to the home. Once Dick satisfies the policy’s 90-day elimination period, the benefits are triggered and the benefit payments can pay for Dick’s care, relieving the financial burden on Jane. Dick and Jane do not need to spend down their assets to qualify for Medicaid, due to the long-term care insurance benefit. If they have substantial additional assets and Dick and Jane wish to do so, they can work with an elder care attorney to protect additional assets that may be at risk after the policy term is exhausted.

 Adult children who want to plan for their parent or parents can benefit from long-term care insurance. Sarah was a single mother in her early 60’s who raised four very successful adult children while working two jobs and living frugally. She is active and healthy and still working at Dunkin Donuts every day. When she retires, based on current projections, her income will limited to Social Security of about $1,500 per month, which is not enough to pay for a nice assisted living facility, if she should need some care. Her now very successful adult children purchase a policy insuring their mother, so that she can now enjoy her golden years in a comfortable community setting if she should need assisted living care. With her income and several years of long-term care insurance, if Sarah were to need a skilled level of care, she could potentially age in place in assisted living, in a very comfortable setting, and then transition to Medicaid after the facility’s private pay period is satisfied.

More information about long-term care insurance in New Jersey is available online at https://www.state.nj.us/dobi/ins_ombudsman/ltcguide.htm.

Smooth Sailing In Your Golden Years

Life is smooth sailing, until it’s not. Don’t jeopardize your independence and quality of life, or your loved ones’ freedom, by waiting for a crisis to plan your elder care and your estate.

The COVID-19 pandemic showed us the importance of being prepared. Failing to plan for death, taxes, long-term care and disability can create hardship and stress. Medicare only pays for a limited amount of long-term care under limited circumstances. Private pay long-term care can cost you and your spouse more than $13,000 per month at the private pay rate in New Jersey. At that rate, your life savings can be quickly dissipated without advance planning. Even the cost of part-time paid care at home can add up quickly. For an idea of the costs you may be facing, check out the Genworth long-term care study at https://www.genworth.com/aging-and-you/finances/cost-of-care.html.

Here are some tips that can help you remain at home as long as possible, avoid an elder care crisis and preserve a legacy for your heirs.

  • Your MVP team should include a tax and estates and elder law attorney, an accountant or enrolled agent, and a financial advisor. They can help you define your goals and the right plan to achieve them.   They can also vet others to help protect you from elder financial and other forms of abuse.
  • Execute a valid Will, a power of attorney and a health care proxy.   Work with your attorney to do this.
  • Discuss your completed estate plan with your attorney and your accountant or financial planner. Understand how your estate will be funded.   
  • Work with an elder care attorney to understand your options for long-term care.
  • Explain your wishes and preferences with your health care proxy and the person who will serve under your power of attorney.    
  • Trusts can protect your life savings, a special needs child or grandchild, and can leverage a charitable gift.  A trust can protect an inheritance from bankruptcy, divorce, disability, addiction and/or some taxes.
  • A revocable trust with a “pour over” will can provide privacy and ease of administration.
  • Periodically review your finances. Update your retirement account and insurance beneficiary designations.
  • Purchase long-term care insurance if you can qualify medically for a policy. Your financial planner can evaluate your disability, long-term care and life insurance needs.  Your elder care attorney can evaluate the policy provisions.
  • Periodically review your legal documents.  If they are outdated, or misplaced, how can they be useful?  
  • Don’t add payable on death or transfer on death designations to all your financial accounts without speaking to an attorney.   
  • Consider a prepaid burial.  Your loved ones and your funeral representative will be grateful that you did.

For questions, contact Jane at Archer Brogan – Elder Law Attorney – Trenton – Princeton – Somerville – Brick – Jamesburg

National Caregiver’s Day: A Look at Elder Care in the Age of COVID-19

It’s National Caregiver’s Day, and another year filled with countless and unimaginable changes has passed. This year especially, my heart goes out to caregivers and their loved ones everywhere! Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, caregiving was no bed of roses. But this year, caregivers are facing an onslaught of new challenges, not the least of which are combatting senior isolation and reduced access to face-to-face therapies and delayed medical examinations. 

How has the COVID-19 pandemic changed care options?  Adult medical day care centers are not providing in person care at their customary location but may deliver services via telehealth and in person visits in the home. This leaves care in the home and care in a long-term care facility as the remaining options for senior care.  

The long-term care industry has been hard hit by the pandemic. From a medical standpoint, until the pandemic subsides, full-time care in the home is probably the safest option. A good option for private care in the home would be hiring a home health aide through an agency.  Benefits of a full-time caregiver (whether hired or by a loved one) include stronger protection of the vulnerable senior, since the caregiver is not moving from home to home (or from home to a nursing home) caring for multiple patients in multiple settings. It can also give the family members or friends who are overseeing the care an opportunity to recharge, which is important to prevent burn out. The right caregiver can provide social companionship to the senior.  

Families considering this option will want to keep in mind that the cost of private, hired live in care will include the cost of groceries for the home health aide, as well as worker’s compensation insurance if the caregiver is providing only companion and housekeeping care. . In such cases, the homeowner’s carrier should be put on notice of the arrangement and the family should work with an accountant to ensure that an accountant or payroll company to ensure compliance with withholding and state insurance requirements. The home’s layout should include a private area with a door that closes for the caregiver, who will need to rest and recharge while the senior is sleeping.  An employment agreement with the caregiver can protect the homeowner and the employer’s rights and ensure that minimum wage and hour requirements are met. If the senior needs care from a certified home health aide, keep in mind that such care can only be provided through a licensed home health care agency with a nurse supervising the implementation of the doctor’s plan of care. Hiring a caregiver to provide such comprehensive care outside of an agency is illegal and potentially places the senior’s well-being at risk.  Agencies do screen their prospective employees, and may be able to identify unsuitable caregivers.  If the caregiver is willing to break state law, how amenable will the caregiver be to calling 9-1-1 if the senior needs emergency medical care of doing so means the caregiver is risking getting caught breaking the law?  The family may expect to save money with an unlicensed, under the table caregiver arrangement, but in addition to being illegal, the fallout from such arrangements tends to be extremely expensive and can take a terrible toll on the senior’s health.  

Another option is care in the home financed through the Veteran’s Special Improved pension/Aid and Attendance, which is a government benefits program for eligible United States military veterans or their surviving spouses to help defray the cost of care.  In cases where the senior qualifies for Medicaid, and is able to remain in the home, programs such as the Personal Preferences Program (PPP), “can provide a source of funding for the senior to choose and hire their preferred caregivers, which can include relatives and friends.” Under the PPP program, the senior chooses the services and schedule they desire. 

The remaining option is care in a long term facility. This may be the best option where the care recipient is a two person assist, has behavioral quirks, or requires a team of trained medical professionals to stabilize and maintain their condition.  In some situations, Medicare dollars can be used for limited periods of time as “key” money to admit the senior to the best facility possible, with the goal of later transitioning to payment for the best care through the   Medicaid program and the senior’s income. 

These are just a few important considerations. For help sorting through your options, consultation with an elder law attorney is recommended.  

For more information about elder care in the age of COVID-19, please feel free to reach out.

Jane Fearn-Zimmer is an Elder and Disability Law, Taxation, and Trusts and Estates attorney. She dedicates her practice to serving clients in the areas of elder and disability law, special needs planning, asset protection, tax and estate planning and estate administration. She also serves as Chair of the Elder & Disability Law section of the NJSBA.